This is default featured slide 1 title
This is default featured slide 2 title
This is default featured slide 3 title
 

Monthly Archives: September 2016

You can Make great Face Painting Ever

Did you realize that face painting is a workmanship which started a great many years back? It was finished by Indian tribes that utilized diverse tribal plans and procedures. Confront paint craftsmanship around then was utilized to characterize the status, culture and tribe of the person. Certain tribes in India still practice this craftsmanship amid tribal festival. Many parts of Asia Africa still have tribes which paint their countenances with various outlines. Confront painting today is utilized by individuals crosswise over different race. It has additionally been utilized as a part of some prominent films. Keep in mind Jim Carey in Mask with the splendid green face and dull long eyebrows and dim lips? Do you wish to make some face painting craftsmanship as well? Utilize the accompanying tips…

Confront Painting Tips and Tricks

  • First of all gather some basic face painting supplies. Always make sure you buy colors which are of cosmetic grade. So, even if you have non-toxic colors DO NOT use them. Only stick to colors which are of cosmetic grade.
  • They are safe to use and if you are painting on children’s face then you need to be more careful with your painting supplies.
  • Also, buy other supplies like brushes, sponges, hand napkins, wet wipes, antibacterial gel sanitizer, etc. All these supplies will come very handy. You will need number 2 brush to 3/4 inch wide brush. Small brushes will help to border your designs, while large brushes will help you color a large area of the face quickly. Sponges will also help you to put color or foundation on the face and neck quickly.
  • Black hand napkins are a good idea as they don’t look dirty and can be used to wipe the paint brushes. Also, keep wet wipes to wipe off the face before you start working on. Use antibacterial wipes or gel to wipe off your hands and brushes, after you are done with one face. This will ensure your clients that you are maintaining good hygiene and safety.
  • So, get your colors, brushes and other face painting supplies. Start with the simplest of designs and symbols.
  • As you are a beginner, start with some cheek face painting designs. Keep a chart or book with various cheek designs for boys, girls, men and women. Ask them to choose a design which they like. If you are painting a child’s face then make sure you take the parents consent first.
  • Keep some headbands or scarves and rubber bands handy. Tie the clients hair back so that it doesn’t fall on the face when you are painting. Then wipe the face with wet wipe and apply foundation. And use your colors and brushes to create the design. Many people tend to blot the makeup with baby powder to prevent it from fading away due to sweating. So, you can do this if you want.
  • After you are done with the face painting, show your client their face paint design using a mirror. Take photograph of your artwork, so that you can save it for your portfolio or blog.
  • Once you have become good at making small cheek paintings, try some innovative full face painting or face and neck paintings. Be very careful while painting near eyes or mouth or nose. These are sensitive areas and a little bit of cosmetic contact can cause itching or serious problems.
  • So, in your free time draw some designs, which you can use to paint on the face. Add the good designs to your template book. You can also add some popular full face painting designs like mask, joker, tiger, butterfly, skeleton, etc.

So, what are you waiting for? Gather the face painting supplies and use some free online cheek painting designs to create cool looking paint painting art. Enjoy!

Simplify the Art

The work, a conventional type of verse, started in Italy, some time amid the thirteenth century CE. “Sonnet” is gotten from the Italian word sonetto, which truly signifies “a little lyric”. It is an extremely melodious sort of verse with a settled rhyme conspire, and an unpretentious, cadenced meter. As the ubiquity of the poem developed over the world with the progression of time, this type of verse was embraced in numerous different nations with various well known writers chipping away at it. Subsequently, the poem advanced, and as should be obvious from a significant number of the later manifestations of English, American, and even Urdu artists, we can state that it developed too.

While writing poetry, special emphasis is almost always laid on its rhyme and rhythm so that it becomes more appealing for the reader. Learning to sonnet would be a good way to make the ‘traditional’ and the ‘modern’ meet―you can stick to the traditional rules of writing a sonnet, while making use of the modern words, thus, ending up creating an evolved and sophisticated poetry. Also, you can say more things in lesser words and that too, in a very romantic way. Buzzle brings you a few practical tips to help you write a soulful sonnet.
How to Write a Sonnet
Sonnet, as mentioned above, evolved over the ages, and so, the format that the first Italian sonnets used also underwent a significant change. In fact, Shakespeare came up with his own, distinct style of sonnet writing, which has thenceforth been known as the Shakespearean Sonnet. Nevertheless, there are a few elements that, even to this day, continue to remain common for all the sonnets. These are as under:

► Each and every sonnet has to have 14 lines; no more, no less.

► Every sonnet has to be written in the iambic pentameter, which means that five (‘penta’ means ‘five’) syllables in each line are specially stressed upon, when the sonnet is read aloud.

► Every sonnet has a fixed, set rhyme scheme. Rhyme schemes may differ from one sonnet to the other; however, within a single sonnet, the poet has to compulsorily follow one, single rhyme scheme; diversion from it may destroy the entire rhythm of the poem.

►Each sonnet, irrespective of whether it is Italian, Shakespearean, Elizabethan, Occitan, or Spenserian, always has a volta. In poetry, volta or turn indicates either a rhetorical variation, or a subtle shift from one emotion and/or thought to another.

Apart from the points mentioned above, every sonnet is written in its own peculiar way. Let us consider two different sonnets and try to analyze what goes into writing them:
Prologue to Romeo and Juliet
“Two households, both alike in dignity,
In fair Verona, where we lay our scene,
From ancient grudge break to new mutiny,
Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.
From forth the fatal loins of these two foes
A pair of star-cross’d lovers take their life;
Whole misadventured piteous overthrows
Do with their death bury their parents’ strife.
The fearful passage of their death-mark’d love,
And the continuance of their parents’ rage,
Which, but their children’s end, naught could remove,
Is now the two hours’ traffic of our stage;
The which, if you with patient ears attend,
What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend.”

― William Shakespeare
On His Blindness
“When I consider how my light is spent
Ere half my days in this dark world and wide,
And that one talent which is death to hide
Lodg’d with me useless, though my soul more bent
To serve therewith my Maker, and present
My true account, lest he returning chide,
“Doth God exact day-labour, light denied?”
I fondly ask. But Patience, to prevent
That murmur, soon replies: “God doth not need
Either man’s work or his own gifts: who best
Bear his mild yoke, they serve him best. His state
Is kingly; thousands at his bidding speed
And post o’er land and ocean without rest:
They also serve who only stand and wait.””

― John Milton
Tip 1: The Number of Syllables
In a sonnet, each of the 14 lines comprise ten syllables, which means that there are total 140 syllables in the entire sonnet. While writing a sonnet, this is the very first thing to keep in mind; none of your lines can contain more (or less) than 10 syllables.

Consider the first lines of the above sonnets:

“Two households, both alike in dignity”
Now let us split the words into individual syllables:
Two1-house2\ holds3-both4\ a5-like6\ in7-dig8\ ni9-ty10

“When I consider how my light is spent”
When we split these words into individual syllables, we have,
When1-I2\ con3-si4-der5\ how6-my7\ light8-is9\spent10
Tip 2: The Iambic Pentameter
The iambic pentameter has to be used uniformly throughout the sonnet. This means that you will need to see to it that five syllables out of ten in each line are stressed more than the others, while you read your poem aloud. The use of this poetic meter imparts a natural rhythm to the sonnet.

Let’s look at the five stressed syllables in the first lines of both the sonnets.

“Two households, both alike in dignity”
Two1-house2\ holds-both3\ a-like4\ in-dig5\ ni-ty

“When I consider how my light is spent”
When1-I\ con2-si-der\ how-my3\ light4-is\spent5
Tip 3: Understanding the Structure
Before you start working on a sonnet, it is vital to understand the various divisions within it. Take a look at the following terms:

►Quatrain refers to four consecutive lines of any poem or a stanza.
► Sestet refers to six consecutive lines of any poem or a stanza.
► Octave refers to eight consecutive lines of any poem or a stanza.
► Couplet refers to any two lines of the poem or stanza, which rhyme with one another.

Shakespearean sonnets invariably have three consecutive quatrains (the first 12 lines divided into three parts of four lines each), and one couplet (the last two lines that rhyme). On the other hand, Petrarchan sonnets comprise one octave (the first eight lines) and one sestet (the last six lines).
Tip 4: The Rhyme Scheme
Rhyme scheme is essentially the pattern in which the lines of a given poem rhyme with each other. The common practice is to use alphabets to indicate two lines that rhyme, with rhyming lines marked with the same alphabet.

Consider the first quatrain of our Shakespearean sonnet:

“Two households, both alike in dignity, (A)
In fair Verona, where we lay our scene, (B)
From ancient grudge break to new mutiny, (B)
Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.” (A)

So, the rhyme scheme of the first quatrain is ABBA.

Now, consider the second quatrain of the same sonnet:

“From forth the fatal loins of these two foes (C)
A pair of star-cross’d lovers take their life; (D)
Whole misadventured piteous overthrows (D)
Do with their death bury their parents’ strife.” (C)

So, the rhyme scheme of the second quatrain is CDDC.

Similarly, consider the third quatrain of the sonnet:

“The fearful passage of their death-mark’d love, (E)
And the continuance of their parents’ rage, (F)
Which, but their children’s end, naught could remove, (F)
Is now the two hours’ traffic of our stage;” (E)

So, the rhyme scheme of the third quatrain is EFFE.

Lastly, look at the remaining couplet:

“The which if you with patient ears attend, (G)
What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend.” (G)

So, the rhyme scheme of the couplet is GG.

The rhyme scheme of our Shakespearean sonnet is ABBA CDDC EFFE GG.

Now, let us take a look at the rhyme scheme of our Petrarchan sonnet. Consider the octave:

“When I consider how my light is spent (A)
Ere half my days in this dark world and wide, (B)
And that one talent which is death to hide (B)
Lodg’d with me useless, though my soul more bent (A)
To serve therewith my Maker, and present (A)
My true account, lest he returning chide, (B)
“Doth God exact day-labour, light denied?” (B)
I fondly ask. But Patience, to prevent” (A)

The rhyme scheme of the octave is ABBAABBA.

Now, for the remaining sestet:

“That murmur, soon replies: “God doth not need (C)
Either man’s work or his own gifts: who best (D)
Bear his mild yoke, they serve him best. His state (E)
Is kingly; thousands at his bidding speed (C)
And post o’er land and ocean without rest: (D)
They also serve who only stand and wait.”” (E)

The rhyme scheme of the sestet is CDECDE.

So, the rhyme scheme of our Petrarchan sonnet is ABBAABBA CDECDE.
** It should be noted that while the rhyme scheme may differ from sonnet to sonnet (of the same type), the structure mostly remains the same. It should also be noted that the Petrarchan sonnets of Dante differ in structure, in that, they have two sestets and two quatrains.
Tip 5: The Plot
After understanding all the prerequisites of a valid sonnet, the next and final step is to develop a plot. Generally, every sonnet begins with an idea, the poet builds on it in the first six to eight lines, and then takes a turn―volta. In the remaining six or seven lines, the tone of the sonnet tends to suddenly change, while the poet either comments on the idea he has attempted to develop and/or tries to solve the problem, if the plot involves one.

►In our Shakespearean sonnet, the first two quatrains describe the plot and the backdrop of Romeo and Juliet in a nutshell. The volta can be noticed at the third quatrain, which tells the audience about the next two hours of the show. In the last couplet Shakespeare promises the audience to be patient and quiet and watch the play, as everything that the prologue (that our sonnet is) leaves out, can be seen on stage.

►Similarly, in our Petrarchan sonnet, Milton begins his first octave by telling us that he is blind. He further says that he believes in his talent, and how he wants to continue serving God by being patient and indulging in the thing he can do the best (writing poems). The volta is visible in the next sestet, wherein Milton speaks about God’s reaction, who tends to remind the poet that He is sovereign, and man should always keep faith in Him, no matter what.
Examples of Sonnets
Here are a few examples of other sonnets, just to give you an idea about their structure and the rhyme scheme that they may follow.
Nuns Fret Not at Their Convent’s Narrow Room
Nuns fret not at their convent’s narrow room (A)
And hermits are contented with their cells; (B)
And students with their pensive citadels; (B)
Maids at the wheel, the weaver at his loom, (A)
Sit blithe and happy; bees that soar for bloom, (A)
High as the highest Peak of Furness-fells, (B)
Will murmur by the hour in foxglove bells: (B)
In truth the prison, into which we doom (A)
Ourselves, no prison is: and hence for me, (C)
In sundry moods, ’twas pastime to be bound (D)
Within the Sonnet’s scanty plot of ground; (D)
Pleased if some Souls (for such there needs must be) (C)
Who have felt the weight of too much liberty, (C)
Should find brief solace there, as I have found. (D)

― William Wordsworth

The above sonnet has an octave and a sestet, and its rhyme scheme is ABBAABBA CDDCCD.
The Cross of Snow
In the long sleepless watches of the night (A)
A gentle face-the face of one long dead- (B)
Looks at me from the wall, where round its head (B)
The night-lamp casts a halo of pale light. (A)
Here in this room she died; and soul more white (A)
Never through martyrdom of fire was led (B)
To its repose; nor can in books be read (B)
The legend of a soul more benedight. (A)
There is a mountain in the distant West (C)
That, sun-defying, in its deep ravines (D)
Displays a cross of snow upon its side. (E)
Such is the cross I wear upon my breast (C)
These eighteen years, through all the changing scenes (D)
And seasons, changeless since the day she died. (E)

― H.W. Longfellow

The above sonnet has an octave and a sestet, and its rhyme scheme is ABBAABBA CDECDE.
Happy ye Leaves! When as Those Lilly Hands
Happy ye leaves! when as those lilly hands, (A)
Which hold my life in their dead doing might, (B)
Shall handle you, and hold in love’s soft bands, (A)
Like captives trembling at the victor’s sight. (B)
And happy lines on which, with starry light, (B)
Those lamping eyes will deign sometimes to look,(C)
And read the sorrows of my dying sprite, (B)
Written with tears in heart’s close bleeding book. (C)
And happy rhymes! bathed in the sacred brook (C)
Of Helicon, whence she derived is, (D)
When ye behold that angel’s blessed look, (C)
My soul’s long lacked food, my heaven’s bliss. (D)
Leaves, lines, and rhymes seek her to please alone, (E)
Whom if ye please, I care for other none. (E)

― Edmund Spenser

The above sonnet has three quatrains and a couplet, and its rhyme scheme is ABAB BCBC CDCD EE.
One thing is for sure, writing a sonnet is not an easy task. One has to practice it over and over again to achieve perfection. It is needless to say that a poet has to make utmost use of his/her feelings and emotions while writing a sonnet, so as to add a soul to it. It is also essential that you read other sonnets aloud so that you understand all the technicalities, including the use of iambic pentameter. The louder you read, the easier it is to identify the “stressed” syllables. So, what are you waiting for? Go on and write down your own sonnet; you will surely bring a smile on your loved one’s face.

Buying Genuine Artwork Online

While the Internet has made our lives advantageous, as it were, it has additionally been touted as a place where no buy can be ensured, and shabby impersonations of genuine items are sold. In spite of the fact that the internet shopping background may not be that terrible for a few, with regards to acquiring craftsmanship on the web, there must be a honest to goodness method for recognizing the realness of the piece you are eagerly going to spend your income for. That impeccable model, that strange photo, that striking painting―what goes into purchasing workmanship on the web? Here are a few tips gathered from worldwide specialists.

Look for Authentic Websites

Experts recommend purchasing art from online extensions of real galleries to ensure their credibility. However, there are other websites that exist solely in the virtual realm, and have been set up so that you can avoid the cost of a middleman, and purchase directly from the seller or even the artist. To verify such websites, look for a physical address, a phone number, and an email address. Call them and discuss the piece you want to buy.
You will be able to gauge from the conversation how well they know their business, and this will increase your confidence in the website that you intend to purchase from. Though this is true of any online shopping experience, ensure that websites you buy artwork from are secure; while paying, the address bar should read https:// that proves that your credit card details will be safe with them.
Learn More About the Artist

You may have seen a piece of art you really like, but do you know the artist? Because of the volatile nature of the art market, it is difficult to predict whether that artwork is going to stand the test of time or retain a position of pride and importance only in your home. If you are purchasing art as an investor, and intend to resell it after the value of the piece appreciates, it is important that you learn as much as you can about the artist.
Alan Bamberger, art consultant and author of The Art of Buying Art, says, “Knowing how to assess an artist’s career information becomes increasingly important the more expensive or significant the art is that you’re thinking about buying.” He suggests learning about the lifetime of the artist, his education, the number of years he has been in the field, the publications that have mentioned him, the galleries/auctions/exhibitions/websites that have showcased his work, and of course, his references from other buyers and gallerists. In short, the popularity of the artist determines the value of the artwork you are going to buy.
Learn More About the Artwork

Is the piece of art a single piece, a part of a collection, or a limited edition? Is it an original or an ‘enhanced’ reproduction, or more importantly, a giclée (a fine art digital print)? Some of these may look original, but upon receiving them, you may realize that they are not. You may be told that you are being sold a signed print, which is not the same as the signature of the artist on the original work.
This is where the verification of the artist and the site becomes more important, to ensure that you are not being conned into spending a colossal amount for something worth much less.
Time Your Purchase
If you happen to find a piece of art that is up for sale as soon as it is launched, you are likely to buy it for less. Since the value of art appreciates over time, it is a good idea to find websites that highlight new releases, from where you can buy originals at their starting price. This also means that eventually, the value of your possession may appreciate, and if you intend to sell it, you may get a suitable return on your investment.
Be Well Aware of Your Requirement

Are you looking for a certain type of artwork? A certain color? A certain size? A certain medium? Ensure that you know exactly what you want so that when you go online, you are not lost for choice, and are in fact, able to easily narrow down your choices based on your preferences. Measure the area where you are going to put the artwork. It may be difficult to judge the scale of the painting online. Something small may look very huge and vice versa.
If possible, get a mock-up and put it up in that space so that you get used to the idea of the size of the artwork.
View the Artwork Closely
Purchasing online means giving up on the facility to see, touch, and experience the artwork in its real glory; of course, this is only one of the things you have to give up for the convenience this medium offers. Colors may vary from screen to screen; what appears salmon on screen may actually be peach in reality, and this can really throw you off balance when you receive the artwork.
So, view the picture of the piece of art in the highest resolution and the maximum screen brightness so that you can see the color and detail as closely to its original self as possible.
Demand a Certificate of Authenticity

All original artwork is accompanied by this document, and if it is not, you know you’re not getting the real deal. Not only does this validate the authenticity, it also is mandatory if you intend to sell the work in the future.
Verify the Shipping and Return Policy
Once you are sure that you’ve found a piece that your heart is set upon, read up on the shipping and delivery policy of the website. We’ve already established that artwork is an expensive investment, so it should be delivered to you in mint condition. Ensure that it is insured for damages during shipping by the seller.
Further, most websites have a return and refund policy, because what if the artwork doesn’t look as it did online, or what if it just isn’t working out in the space you had planned to put it up in? If a website does not have this policy, steer clear of it. There is a stipulated time within which the artwork may be returned (usually 7 days from the date of receipt), but this may be different for each website.
Explore, Explore, Explore!

It is easy to like something online and purchase it immediately. However, spend some time in research. Don’t rush in. Experts suggest using a minimum of one month to research and identify your taste in art. Once you are able to do so, it is only then that you should go ahead and make that purchase. One more thing that you should do is buy one small piece of artwork, and see how that works out.
Did you get what you were looking for? Does it look exactly as it did online? Did you have any trouble during shipping/payment? Does it suit the space you have bought it for? Does it suit your taste? If the answer to all or most of these questions is yes, you can safely switch to online shopping for artwork.
Remember, however, that nothing beats the real-world experience of interacting with art connoisseurs, and understanding the meaning behind each piece of artwork. So, while you do switch to online shopping, make it a point to, once in a while, step into a gallery and enjoy the real experience.